Things You Must Know to Fight a Traffic Ticket

Every driver has dealt with the unpleasantness of receiving a traffic ticket at least once. One moment you are cruising down the highway and the next moment you see those dreaded flashing lights behind you telling you to pull over. One small infraction shouldn’t taint your driving record or hike up your insurance rates. If you learn how to fight a traffic ticket, you can keep your driving record clean and keep your hard earned money where it belongs – in your pocket.

When you get pulled over, always remember to be respectful and courteous to the officer. Sarcastic remarks or arguing will not be received well and may actually get you into even more trouble. Be sure to answer the officer’s questions directly, and don’t elaborate on them. Never get out of your car unless the officer asks you to, as this could be seen as a sign of aggression.

Do not openly admit your guilt or try to think of outlandish stories or excuses for your behavior. Reply with a simple, “No, Sir” or “No, Ma’am” when the officer asks if you know why they pulled you over. It is their responsibility to explain what the offense is, and they should do it in as much detail as possible. If you were speeding, make sure they let you know how fast you were going, and how much above the speed limit that is.

If you are going to court, you will need to know the name of the officer and their badge number. This is written on the ticket but is sometimes illegible, so be sure to ask. For a speeding infraction, ask the officer about the device that was used and where they were located when they determined that you were going too fast. Check that area for clearly marked speed limit signs. If there are none, take pictures so that you have further evidence for your court hearing.

When you ask very specific questions, it can sometimes lead the officer to believe that it’s not worth the effort of showing up to the court date. If they think that you will gather enough evidence they may conclude that your ticket will get thrown out or the charge will be lessened anyway. Officers have to appear in court on their day off, and many would rather be with their family or out on the driving range. Your case will be automatically dismissed if the officer does not appear.

You can still win, however, even if the officer does make an appearance, especially if it is your first offense, or it is deemed as a minor one. You can get the charge completely thrown out, or the fine may be reduced. If it is a more serious infraction, you may want to consider hiring an attorney. Companies such as X-Coppers are run by former police officers and can help give you tips and strategies on how to win your case. You will have to determine whether or not it is worth spending the extra money on this kind of help.

You will need to be prepared for your court case, whether you hire a lawyer or not. Prepare your statement to the judge well in advance and gather as much information as possible. A motion of discovery should be filed as soon as your ticket is received, as this is your right to know exactly what you are being charged with and what kind of evidence will be presented. Knowledge beforehand is key in order to defend yourself effectively.

Some jurisdictions offer traffic school as an option, instead of being convicted with an offense. Check your local area to see if this is a viable choice. It is always a good plan to voluntarily sign up for a refresher course and will help to prevent further tickets and fines. Not getting a ticket in the first place is the best strategy in learning how to fight a traffic ticket. Call the Traffic Ticket Team now, 954-967-9888 http://www.TrafficTicketTeam.com

It happens to all of us at one time or another – the dreaded traffic ticket. One minute you could be making great time on your morning commute, and the next minute you see those flashing lights in your rear view mirror indicating the need to pull over. One momentary lapse in judgment shouldn’t mean that your driving record be tarnished for years to come; learning how to fight a traffic ticket can ensure that you don’t pay a big fine or have to pay more for insurance.

The first thing to remember is to be polite and respectful to the officer who pulls you over. Being sarcastic or saying things like “my taxes pay for your salary, ” will not go over well and may in fact get you into even more trouble. Answer all of the officer’s questions in a direct manner and don’t attempt to get out of your vehicle unless specifically asked to do so.

Another important thing to remember is not to admit guilt or come up with outrageous excuses. When the officer asks if you know why you were pulled over, answer with a simple, “No I do not officer.” Let them explain to you in detail what your offense is. If you were caught speeding, make sure they tell you the speed that you were going, and what the posted speed limit actually is.

Be sure to get the officer’s name and badge number as you will need it if you go to court. Also, if they offense is speeding, ask very detailed questions about the device they used to determine your speed. Find out where the officer was located and check to make sure that speed limits are clearly posted. If not, take pictures of the area you were driving in as proof that you were not sure what the limit was.

Sometimes, asking very detailed, specific questions may deter the officer from appearing in court; they may determine that it’s just not worth the effort and with all of the evidence that you have gathered, a judge will rule in your favor. Officers have to come to court on their own time, and they may very well prefer to golf that day. If the officer does not appear, then your ticket is automatically deemed null and void.

If the officer does appear, and this is your first offense then chances are you can still win your case. The judge may decide to lessen the charge so you don’t have to pay as much or lose your license. Depending on what the offense is, you may want to hire a lawyer. There are also organizations owned by former police officers that can give you advice and help you fight your ticket. You will have to decide whether it is worth the extra money you will need to spend on this type of assistance.

Whether you hire a lawyer or decide to represent yourself, it’s critical that you be prepared for your court date. Get as much information as possible and know what you are going to say to the judge. File a motion of discovery as soon as you get your ticket; this is your right to know all of the evidence that is being presented against you and will help you build your case. You can’t fight what you don’t know.

The judge may be willing to lessen or dismiss your charge if you indicate that you are willing to go to traffic school. Check with your local jurisdiction to see if this is an option in your area. A refresher course is always a good idea and will help to prevent further tickets and offenses. It may be your best strategy in how to fight a traffic ticket. If you get a ticket, call 954-967-9888 www.TrafficTicketTeam.com

Any Drugs While Driving Can Get You Arrested

Whether it’s cold medicine, cough syrup, a legal prescription drug or alcohol, if you ingest too much and drive a vehicle, you can be charged with driving under the influence. “Even if someone is taking prescription drugs legally, they can be charged with DUI,” said Sgt. Kim Montes, spokeswoman for the Florida Highway Patrol district that includes Volusia County. “If a trooper evaluates someone, either on a traffic stop or at a crash scene, and determines they are impaired from alcohol, illegal or legal drugs, or another substance, they can be arrested.” The FHP recently charged a man with DUI manslaughter in an Orlando case because they believe he had inhaled computer cleaner, Montes said. Toxicology reports, which reveal the presence of substances in the blood that can lead to impairment, can take several months to complete, said FHP Lt. Bill Leeper. He noted authorities are awaiting toxicology results in at least one Flagler County crash involving serious injuries. The Friends Drive Sober organization devotes a section of its website to prescription and over-the-counter drugs and their effect on drivers. “Drugs impair our bodies in a variety of ways,” the site reads. “They may blur our vision; make us tired or too excited; alter depth perception; make us see or hear things that may not be there; raise or lower blood pressure; react too quickly, too slowly, or not at all. They cause problems with concentrating on the task at hand.”  The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention specifically lists cough and cold medications containing dextromethorphan as one of the most commonly misused over-the-counter drugs, “to get high.” “The pivotal issue when it comes to controlled substances is impairment,” said Chris Kelly, spokesman for the State Attorney’s Office. The short answer, he said, as to whether a person is guilty of driving under the influence depends on two things: the impaired individual is in control of the vehicle and, per state statute, “that the person’s normal faculties are impaired.” It’s up to the discretion of law enforcement to determine whether a driver should undergo testing and whether a breath or blood test is requested. “If we have an idea of what types of drugs they may be taking, then we can ask for that drug to be specifically tested,” Montes said. The Florida Department of Law Enforcement runs a panel for all controlled substances when blood is drawn, said spokeswoman Susie Murphy. “We don’t typically test for huffing (inhaled) agents,” Murphy said. “We don’t test for over-the-counter drugs at all.” But that doesn’t mean a person can’t be charged with DUI for taking over-the-counter medication.  “If someone were to ingest enough over-the-counter medicine, they could also be arrested forDUI if it is determined that they are impaired,” Montes said. So if you get in a situation you need legal help, please call the Traffic Ticket Team at 954-967-9888 or go to our site, www.TrafficTicketTeam.com Diamond, Kistner & Diamond, P.A.

How Points Work on Your License

www.trafficticketteam.com

Traffic Ticket Team McLovin

The most common civil traffic citation given by law enforcement around the state is for the offense of speeding. In 2007, there were 1.3 million speeding tickets issued by police in the State of Florida. That number is not a true reflection on the real number of speeding tickets, because law enforcement has the discretion to “cut someone a break” and charge them with violating the speed limit sign. That violation is referred to as violation of a traffic control device, and it is possible that the number of speeding tickets would be closer to 1.8 million. Given those unbelievable numbers in the Florida, Speeding tickets can be divided in to 3 distinct categories as far as punishment is concerned.

1) 15 MPH OR LESS OVER THE LAWFUL OR POSTED SPEED

Receiving a citation for going 15mph or less over the speed limit carries with it a fine along with 3 points on your license. The amount of fine is usually listed on the back of the ticket and is actually set by each individual county. The points will stay on your license for 3 years and the ticket will be on your driving record forever. Depending on your insurance company it could also result in an insurance increase. No court date is required if your citation fits within this category. You can either pay it and get the points, do traffic school if eligible, or contact our office immediately to obtain information on fighting it.

2) 16 MPH OR MORE OVER THE LAWFUL OR POSTED SPEED

Receiving a citation for going 16mph or more over the speed limit carries with it a specific fine along with 4 points going on your license. The amount of fine is usually listed on the back of the ticket or you can visit a website that lists every clerk’s office. Then just look in the upper left hand corner of your citation and find the county in which you received the citation. The points will stay on your license for 3 years and the ticket will stay on your record forever. Depending on your insurance company it could also result in your insurance costs increasing. No court date is required.

3) 30 MPH OR MORE OVER THE LAWFUL OR POSTED SPEED

This is the 2nd most serious type of speeding citation you can receive. If you receive a citation for going 30mph over the posted speed limit, it carries with it a fine, possibility of 4 points on your license, possibility of a license suspense, and a mandatory court date. The amount of fine is set by the Judge at the court hearing. The points will stay on your license for 3 years and the ticket will stay on your record forever. Depending on your insurance company it could also result in your insurance costs increasing. Failing to appear at your court date could result in your license being suspended. This is referred to a D-6 suspension.

4) 50 MPH OR MORE OVER THE SPEED LIMIT-STATUTE 316.1926

Beginning October 1, 2008, the Florida legislature passed a new speeding bill. If you are charged with driving 50 MPH over the posted speed limit pursuant to Florida statute 316.1926, you will be facing a civil penalty of $1000.00. On a second offense, the fine is up to $2500.00 and the court will revoke your license for a period of one year. On a third offense you will be charged with a third degree felony and will face a fine up to $5000.00 and the loss of your driver’s license for 10 years.

Regardless of which type of ticket you receive we do not recommend just paying the ticket before contacting our office to go over possible defenses. Often we are able to get the ticket dismissed or keep the points off your license, which normally will save your insurance costs from increasing. **In addition you will not have to attend your court date, we will attend it for you. So call the Traffic Ticket Team now. 954-967-9888 http://www.TrafficTicketTeam.com

**each insurance company is different, contact your carrier to discuss how receiving a ticket will affect you.

 

DMV System Crashes, Long Lines to Get Your License

Traffic Ticket lawyer Intermittent outages of the Florida Department of Motor Vehicles mainframe servers have led to system crashes at driver’s license offices across the state, making already long waits even longer for frustrated customers. ”All I’m doing is sitting here waiting,” said Jeff Gilman, who arrived at the DMV office on Military Trail at about noon Friday and was still waiting to be served four hours later, along with about 60 other people.  The system has been unstable since Nov. 3 and it has been declared it a critical situation, said Courtney Heidelberg, DMV’s deputy communications director. The problem has not been fixed yet, she said. Customers at DMV offices were already facing long waits because of tougher ID requirements for obtaining licenses since the Sept. 11, 2001 terrorist attacks. Although Gilman said officials offered to let people make appointments to come back another day because of the sporadic outages, he said he was concerned he’d just run into the same problems again. The lengthy wait times were exacerbated at the Deerfield office because its two bathrooms were out of order most of the afternoon.  ”The bathroom backed up and the sewage came up out of the floor,” said Uranius Cruz, of Deerfield Beach, who arrived at the office at 11:30 a.m. and wasn’t finished until 3:45 p.m. Scott Vincent, of Margate, came to the Deerfield DMV office Friday after stopping by the Margate officefirst. ”The line was even longer in Coral Springs,” said Vincent, who arrived at 2:30 p.m. and planned to stay as late as necessary. Officials said anyone in line as of 5 p.m. would be seen. The Traffic Ticket Team is aware of the problem and trying to help people in a similar situation. If you get a traffic ticket, call the www.trafficticketteam.com, Jason Diamond, Diamond, Kistner & Diamond, 954-967-9888. Let us Fight your Traffic Ticket. Do not pay that traffic ticket, fight back.

 

Sunrise Cops Have a Traffic Ticket Quota…

Traffic Ticket Team

Sunrise cops are expected to make a minimum of 45,612 traffic stops a year. (Michael Francis McElroy, Sun Sentinel /August 20, 2010)

Sunrise road patrol officers are expected to make at least three traffic stops a day, according to a complaint form on the officer filed in May. That means the city’s 84 road patrol officers have to make at least 45,864 stops a year, about half the city’s population.With Sunrise home to Sawgrass Mills  mall, a top tourist destination in South Florida, folks from all over are at risk of being pulled over and given a ticket. What it could cost you, on average: $200.

“The public thinks it’s a gotcha game and they are going to get you if they have to meet that quota,” said Bob Jarvis, a law professor at Nova Law School in Davie. Officers who meet the quota — referred to as “shift standards” by department brass — are in line for promotions, special assignments and raises, say union officials. Those who don’t risk a written reprimand, they say. The Sunrise police union does not condone quotas of any kind, said Roger Krege, union president.The officers making the traffic stops are “just following orders,” Krege said. Officers need to be able to make decisions without “external influences” from supervisors who demand a set number of stops per day. Chief John Brooks, who joined the department in June 2007, denied having a quota.”I don’t have a ticket quota and I don’t have an arrest quota,” Brooks said. “It’s not illegal, but it’s unethical.”

Capt. Robert Voss, who oversees the department’s road patrol officers, says supervisors need some way to measure performance. The number of daily traffic stops an officer makes helps gauge productivity, Voss said. “Those are guidelines for them to follow,” Voss said. “We have to have a way to measure what an officer is doing out there. The officers are making a lot of money. We want to make sure they’re working.” The standards apply only to the officers assigned to road patrol, Voss said, not to the department’s entire 172-member force.

Mayor Roger Wishner characterized the three-stops-a-day rule as community policing, where officers focus on certain neighborhoods to help reduce traffic accidents. “I don’t support a quota system, but I do want our officers out there enforcing traffic laws,” Wishner said. Deputy Mayor Sheila Alu also backs Brooks’ rule, in effect since July 2008. “I think he’s trying to keep the officers accountable,” Alu said. “He wants to make sure the officers are doing their jobs and performing.” From October 2008 through September 2009, Sunrise collected $431,200 in traffic fines and court costs, city records show. Sunrise has collected $352,000 in ticket money from October 2009 through early August.  In addition to the traffic stops, Sunrise officers are required to make three “Field Interrogation Card” reports each month — or 3,024 every year. Officers use the FIC reports to document suspicious activity — and to prove they are working, Sunrise police officials say. One officer has Voss wondering just what he could be doing his entire 11.5-hour shift. Bruce Charlton, a 21-year veteran who works the day shift, has been written up three times this year for failing to meet shift standards. In February, he had one traffic stop and no FI cards. In March, he had no traffic stops and one FI card. In April, he made seven traffic stops and wrote one FIC report. “I have personally given verbal warnings to Officer Charlton and have placed notes and copies of his stats in his shift file regarding his lack of productivity,” Sgt. Mark Hudson wrote in a May 17 complaint on the officer. “By failing to heed repeated supervisor warnings, Officer Charlton remains in violation of Department Policy and Procedure. Technically, Charlton was written up for disobeying an order. The order: To make more traffic stops and write more FI Cards. Charlton, 41, said this in his defense: “We have over 200 different responsibilities to perform during our shift and it’s not fair to the public’s safety or officers’ safety to pigeonhole our performance solely on traffic stops and FI Cards.

The other officers have to neglect their other duties for fear of discipline if they don’t meet the shift standards.” Traffic quotas may not be illegal in Florida but they are frowned on, said Bob Dekle, a law professor at the UF, “The problem you get into with quotas, every stop is open to public criticism,” he said. “The accusation is, ‘You did it because you had a quota to make, not because the person was doing something wrong.’ That’s why quotas are a bad idea.”  On the other hand, Dekle said he understands the dilemma for supervisors who want to make sure the rank and file are not sleeping on the job. “It shouldn’t be too hard for officers to make three traffic stops a day and three field interrogations a month,” Dekle said. “If the officer is not doing that, you have to wonder what he is doing.” Officials with the Broward Sheriff’s Office say the agency does not have quotas. The Fort Lauderdale and Hollywood police departments say the same. Fort Lauderdale does require its officers to meet “performance standards” to measure productivity, Sgt. Frank Sousa said. Officers are evaluated on the quantity of their work, but are not required to “write five tickets a day or make three arrests,” Sousa said. Nor are they required to conduct a set number of traffic stops or “Field Interrogation Cards,” he said. The Sun Sentinel reviewed 287 FI Cards written by Sunrise officers between June 19 and July 19. Subjects were questioned for many reasons — loitering, walking home, driving around “aimlessly,” sitting in a parked car at a shopping center after hours. Will Carrasco, a Plantation resident questioned by Sunrise police in June, was not surprised to hear of the shift standards.”It sounds like a quota to me,” Carrasco said. Carrasco, 27, and his brother-in-law were camped out in his car outside Sawgrass Mills about 3:30 a.m. June 19, hoping to be first in line to buy a new Jordan sneaker. “Three cops came up and said ‘What are you doing here?'” Carrasco recounted. “We were sitting in the car with snacks and water, minding our own business. I can’t really blame them. But I think sometimes they overdo it. Three of them showed up.”

If you get caught speeding, you should call the Traffic Ticket Team, http://www.trafficticketteam.com, to fight your Florida Traffic Ticket. If you get a traffic ticket for anything, speeding, red light, DUI or anything else, call us anytime to fight your traffic ticket at 954-967-9888, Law Offices of Jason A. Diamond, P.A. and Diamond, Kistner & Diamond.

Red Light Cameras Irresponsible

Traffic Ticket Team

Red Light Traffic Ticket Team

According to the New Times of Broward, Red-light cameras, when misused by idiotic and irresponsible public officials, can be one of the great scourges of America.  ​That much is fact. Even when they are used with some semblance of jurisprudence, they might be flat-out illegal. We’ll just have to see how the court challenges turn out. But in the wrong hands, they can be downright evil. Check out this Miami Herald story on the poor people of Aventura — and all others who drive in that city — who are getting shaken down by their own government for hundreds, sometimes thousands of dollars. Their “crime”: Rolling a red light on a right turn. You do it all the time even if you don’t know it. You come up on an intersection, see there’s no cars coming, and never quite come to a complete stop. In Aventura, this will get you a $125 fine for the first offense, $250 for the second, and a whopping $500 for each additional. It’s obscene, and making it worse is that if one of the cameras got installed at a red light near you, you could rack up multiple fines before you get the notice in the mail telling you did anything wrong in the first place. Responsible towns don’t do this. Pembroke Pines, which was the first city in Broward to install the cameras (send your thanks to Angelo Castillo), doesn’t do it. West Palm Beach did it for a while but then realized how grotesque it was. In May, WBP not only discontinued the practice but decided to refund all the money it generated from such fines back to the citizens who paid them. But some towns just don’t get it. Here’s the top of the Herald story: Jeff and Patricia Rudman have an unexpected $2,000 bill to pay. The Sunny Isles Beach clothing salesman came home from work to find his pregnant wife sobbing, holding several tickets for failing to come to a complete stop at a camera-monitored red light in Aventura. After a $125 ticket in the mail the previous day, five more — amounting to $1,875 more fines — were dropped in the mailbox that afternoon. All of them were for making only a rolling stop before a right turn at Aventura Boulevard and West Country Club Drive, nabbed by one of the red-light violation camera fast spreading throughout South Florida. And all were within a weeklong period. “Two-thousand dollars to anybody right now is a hit, and to us, with a third kid coming, it’s beyond. It’s just way too much,” Jeff Rudman said. Rudman is among a contingent of South Floridians who’ve received multiple tickets for red-light violations before they even knew they were breaking the rules. “We didn’t have a chance to learn what we did wrong,” he said. “I don’t think anybody in their right mind, knowing full well that the oven is hot, is going to put their hand in the oven. We didn’t get the opportunity to get burned the first time.” … City officials argue the law against running red lights has been on the books for decades, and drivers who break the law shouldn’t complain when they get caught. “That requirement that you come to a complete stop before turning right on red, it’s been a state law for many, many years,” said Joanne Carr, Aventura’s community development director. First off, Joanne Carr should be fired. Period. She obviously has no understanding of basic concepts like justice and fairness. Next every elected official in the town should be run out on a rail. Don’t pay these fines. Go to court and fight them. Judges, do your duty and dismiss the cases one after another until the derelict cities follow in West Palm Beach’s footsteps. If you get caught speeding, running a red light, stop sign or DUI, you should call the Traffic Ticket Team, http://www.trafficticketteam.com, to fight your Florida Traffic Ticket. If you get a traffic ticket for anything, speeding, red light, DUI or anything else, call us anytime to fight your traffic ticket at 954-967-9888, Law Offices of Jason A. Diamond, P.A. and Diamond, Kistner & Diamond.  Our attorney’s have handled over 1,000,000 traffic tickets so before you call some random ticket clinic to help you, call a Team of lawyers who handle every case as if was our own.

<a href=”http://www.trafficticketteam.com/” rel=”nofollow”>Traffic Ticket</a>


Clerks Of Court Facing More Cuts $$$

As elected clerks of court, we are deeply concerned about the amendment to the Senate General Appropriations Act, which proposes another $23 million cut to the clerks’ statewide budget. In Broward and Palm Beach alone, more than 250 employees were laid off last year. These additional cuts mean up to another 130 people may be laid off. The result will be a direct impact on the citizens we serve and our local economy. There are documented, quantifiable costs associated with court-related delays in civil cases, with a direct economic impact approaching $10.1 billion annually in the state of Florida. You may recall that clerks’ budgets across the state were cut by almost $90 million last year, and almost 1,300 people were laid off statewide. More than 30 clerk branch service offices were closed. Those reductions, combined with the ones proposed, will critically impact the ability of Florida’s clerks to provide constitutionally and statutorily required services. However, before we cut services, we adopted technologies to ensure our offices were running as lean as possible. We have been cut to the bone, and with 90,000 foreclosures pending, we’re not getting the job done. The public’s access to the courts will be further restricted as customers wait in line for hours. Businesses will lose thousands of dollars because of case processing backlogs delaying certificates of titles, writs of possession and court docket updates. Civil court lawyers will be the hardest hit by backlogs, as clerks shift from civil departments to criminal to meet statutory requirements such as “speedy trial” — a mandate to give criminal cases top priority. Our legislators need to hear from everyone that cutting the clerks’ budgets for two years in a row will limit access to the courts and directly affect court users. It is unconscionable to impact Florida’s economic recovery by restricting access to the courts in these difficult times. If you are a local Florida Bar member, a member of the business community or just a person who has dealings with the courts, you need to reach out to your state senators and representatives to prevent another direct hit on your economic future and the future of Florida. If you get caught speeding, you should call the Traffic Ticket Team, http://www.trafficticketteam.com, to fight your Florida Traffic Ticket. If you get a traffic ticket for anything, speeding, red light, DUI or anything else, call us anytime to fight your traffic ticket at 954-967-9888, Law Offices of Jason A. Diamond, P.A. and Diamond, Kistner & Diamond.

New Documentation To Renew Your License

Traffic Ticket Team

Traffic Ticket Team

A visit to the driver’s license office has always been a little slice of hell.  Now it’s gotten even worse.  Florida’s strict new identity requirements for license renewal are steering drivers to new heights of confusion, costing them time from work, sending them on laborious paper chases and forcing return trips to the dreaded DMV. “It’s very frustrating,” said Harmony Hoot, of Lake Worth who, along with her fiancé recently was on her third attempt in a day to renew his license. “I’ll admit I was yelling. There were some profanities.”  The source of Hoot’s woe: A new state law that went into effect Jan. 1 requiring drivers to provide more documentation before renewing a license. Where formerly you needed only to produce your old license to get a new one, you must now cough up more solid identification such as a birth certificate or passport.  Further proof is required in the form of a Social Security card. If the flimsy card has disintegrated in your wallet over the past decades, a W-2 tax form or paycheck bearing the nine magic numbers will do. But that’s not all. The state demands not one, but two proofs of residency bearing your address, which can be a utility bill, mortgage statement or vehicle registration or title. Parents can accompany minor drivers and attest to their residency as long as the parent has the required proof of address.  Married women using their husband’s name will need to produce a marriage certificate. “I was not told I need a marriage certificate just to renew my license,” said a disheartened Lucy Garcia, of Tamarac, who for a second time was turned away from the license office in Lauderhill. “Who knows how much longer I’m going to be coming here?”  But at least the Lauderhill office had staffers out front to cull from the herd people who lacked sufficient documentation, sparing them a wait in line.  The documentation requirements are part of the REAL ID Act passed by Congress in 2005 in response to the Sept. 11, 2001, terror attacks. The hijackers used false identification, including Florida driver’s licenses. A majority of states has refused to comply with the act, and federal authorities have postponed until mid-2011 a deadline for it to take effect. Gary Biller, director of the National Motorists Association, a driver’s advocacy group, said the new requirements are too extreme. However, if you get caught speeding, you should call the Traffic Ticket Team, http://www.trafficticketteam.com, to fight your Florida Traffic Ticket. Call us anytime to fight your traffic ticket at 954-967-9888, Law Offices of Jason A. Diamond, P.A. and Diamond, Kistner & Diamond.

Speeding Ticket Iphone Application

traffic ticket team

Traffic Ticket Team

A popular phone app could help you avoid a pricey speeding ticket. Sounds like the kind of program police wouldn’t embrace, but that’s not necessarily the case. When Art Acevedo took over as Austin police chief, one of his first orders of business was to eliminate the daily news releases about where APD was running radar. However, the Travis County Sheriff’s office is embracing new technology and the concept that the more information the public has, the safer the roads will be.  It’s not uncommon to see law enforcement officers armed with radar guns aimed at oncoming drivers. Now with a simple check of the app on a 3-G phone or by going on line, Central Texas drivers can know in advance where deputies with the Travis County Sheriff’s Office will be running radar. “It’s simply a way for us to communicate with the public the areas where they need to slow down and comply with the speed laws. The added benefit is notifying people if there is some change in the road conditions that affects their safe driving,” said Roger Wade, the public information officer for the Travis County Sheriff’s Office.  The Trapster App also alerts drivers to flooded roadways or accidents that could delay their trip, but the main focus is on radar detection.  “The bottom line is we want to make the roads safer for Travis County and this is another tool that will do that,” said Wade. The question seems to be whether it’s better to let the public know where radar is being run or not.  Austin Police Chief Art Acevedo prefers not to give advance notice. “It kind of defeats the purpose of being out there,” said Acevedo. “We want people to know that we were working it but telling them the specific roadways was a little counterproductive for us.”  Drivers we spoke to were split.  “Yeah I think it is a good idea and I probably would use it,” said John Egan. “If you know we are running late for work or if I am in a hurry, we would want to know there is going to be a cop around the corner. I will slow down,” said Sean Munoz. “Some people are going to have radar detectors anyway and they are going to find out if they want to find out,” said Diane from Austin. “But most people are not going to take the time to look into something.”  Drivers can add data to Trapster, just like the Travis County Sheriff’s office does — but if it’s inaccurate, it can be taken down.  By the way, Roger Wade tells us his office doesn’t make any money off Trapster. The app is free of charge. However, if you get caught speeding, you should call the Traffic Ticket Team, http://www.trafficticketteam.com, to fight your Florida Traffic Ticket. Call us anytime to fight your traffic ticket at 954-967-9888, Law Offices of Jason A. Diamond, P.A. and Diamond, Kistner & Diamond.